Friday, April 8, 2011

Tart Rings

Of all my bakings, I sure have made alot of Tarts.Whether it is sweet filled with pastry cream and topped with fruits, savory baked with vegetables or plain simple custard ones, I love them all. When I first started making the tarts, I was more concerned of making a steady tart case that can withstand moisture when I needed to store it in the fridge. After trials and errors over the years, I think I have perfected the tart crust and now I am into making beautiful tarts, incorporating lovely colors of different ingredients and trying out all shapes of tarts.

Recently I got these type of Tart Rings and have used it twice within a week. All this time I have used those fluted ones and I love this ring shape that yields a smooth side which looks very neat and just like the professionals would bake their tarts. As there was no bottom part, I had to use an extra baking sheet on the bottom and to contain the whole Tart Ring itself. I like the quality of these Tart Rings as they were made of sturdy stainless steel. They are pricier than the usual fluted tart pans and may take one to practise a few times to get a hang on using it.



For the first try, I wasn't sure on how much extra tart dough to leave overhanging the rim of the Tart ring as there will always be some shrinking during the baking. I overlapped it to 1/2 inch and hoping that I can kind of cut or saw it off once it is baked. I think I poured too much of the Hazelnut Frangipane filling into the lined Tart ring and during baking, it overflowed to the rim and the extra overhanging tart dough was baked in.



For the second try, I made this Vegetable Tart of which I didn't overfill the lined tart dough before baking. And I still left a 1/2 inch extra dough overhanging at the rim of the Tart Ring. This time I was able to get an almost perfect looking tart until I try to cut away the extra baked dough on the rim of the tart. I think that if I bake the tart case prior to putting in the filling might do the trick of giving me a perfect looking tart. My idea is to blind bake the tart case and take it out and cut off the extra overhanging dough then while it is still semi-baked and soft to cut. Once the tart case is baked, it was totally impossible for me to cut off to yield a perfect rim.


My verdict for these Tart Rings:

Pros:
1) They are made of good quality Stainless Steel and easy to clean with one swipe of the sponge and soap as compared to the fluted tins that require more attention to cleaning the many fluted crevaces.
2) The tart looks clean and bakes evenly.

Cons:
1)Require greasing prior to lining the tart dough.
2)An extra flat firm large pan is required to hold the tart ring.
3)Lifting the baked Tart out of the ring after the baking is a bit difficult, especially when there is extra dough baked onto the rim of the Tart ring. Precision in cutting around the rim is required as not to damage the sides of the tart. This is more easily done with the fluted pan that has a removable bottom.

What I will do next: Practise!

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